Tag Archives: Trading psychology

Professional vs Amateur trader

Traders

This blogpost is a small effort to delineate the thought process of a Professional in comparison to an amateur trader.

Introduction

It is a common understanding that trading profit on any given trade can be construed as the compensation we receive for the risk we took on the trade. Traders take risk, in the sense they routinely make judgments with uncertain outcomes. So it would follow then, that good traders don’t try to eliminate risk as much as manage it, and instead, can increase their chance of profitability by better reducing that uncertainty !!

This can be accomplished by making better trading decisions than those that are less informed, less knowledgeable, and less skilled. Ultimately, it is not what the trader knows, but who he is. The really consistently profitable traders are able to ignore or subvert their natural tendencies to do what feels comfortable, and instead, do what is necessary, to be optimally profitable over the long run.

Amateur traders

1. Watch what other traders do and be sure to follow the crowd. After all, they have been trading a lot longer than him/her and hence, naturally they should be more ‘smarter’

2. Never worry about using stop loss orders. When the time comes, he will be able to sell his open position(s) and take a loss. Our emotions won’t even come into play. Besides, stop loss orders are for weaklings 🙂

3. Setting high standards to achieve and feeling beaten when they fail to meet their expectations. Suddenly,they are disappointed/stressed out,and prone to make trading errors. Losses start to mount,mood worsens and before they know it, they find themselves in a deep psychological hole of despair.

4. They dislike regret more than losses. Their avoidance of regret is more powerful than the fear of loss. It’s one thing to make a losing trade, but it is quite another to feel that we’ve made a mistake, and continually berate ourselves for making it.

Professional traders

1. They don’t give a hoot about anything/anyones opinions of what the market will/might do.The very news/opinions that surround them becomes the mortar for their brick wall of defense that protects their completely independent thinking (Keyword here is ‘Independent’)

2. They have incredible discipline to not buckle under pressure. They have a perfectly clear head and understand fully what they do and how they do it. Battle wounds and memories of defeat are more valuable to them than the money.

3. Their self esteem do not rise and fall with trading results. Their self concept is strong/durable and not at the mercy of the current, last, or next trade.

4. As they know that their experience in markets is a reflection of their personal life, they keep their personal life/finance in order as that will nicely percolate into their trading. They take care of their bodies with healthy diets/exercises, while understanding that recreation is a vital activity in keeping trading performance at peak level.

Conclusion

A budding trader’s goal should be to move from the 1st group (amateur trading) to 2nd group (professional trading) as early as possible. It is easier said than done though.

Please do remember that ‘Winning’ is just the culmination of lessons learned by making our own mistakes – not from other people’s mistakes. Many folks would disagree here and they believe that one can learn from the mistakes of others in trading. This statement is absurd, to say the least. Especially in an experiential profession like trading the markets where one has to go through the path on his own. Our biggest nemesis is in between the ears and one has to face their own demons(often unique) in trading.

Want to end this blogpost with this thought – ‘Professional traders attitude’ can be abbreviated as FEDCOP

Focused (on the trade only)
Emotionally Stable (treat winning and losing the same)
Disciplined (in trade management)
Confident (in methodology & risk management)
Objective (Unbiased)
Patient (to wait for the opportunity & to maximize profit)

Happy trading !!

Get comfortable being wrong

ComfortZone

Human nature is to be right all the time. Nobody likes to be wrong even in petty/useless arguments. This particular thought process is one of the primary reasons for many opting for methods that shows high winning percentage with abysmal Risk:Reward ratio. Many of the world’s renowned traders are trend followers and trend following usually delivers something that human brain is not used to – More losers than winners with superior Risk:Reward ratio.

Introduction

In trend following type of trading, the usual combination is low winning percentage with high Risk:Reward. This requires a trader to get comfortable with the fact that we will most likely be wrong more often than we are right.

That concept is tough for a lot of traders,as many of us believe that to be profitable we need to be right more than we are wrong. but nothing could be further from the truth. Yes, for scalping that is partially true, but for swing trading, with the proper risk to reward ratio, we can be profitable even if we are wrong more than we are right.

We just need to have the patience to wait for a trade to come, and also patience to wait for a trade to work.

Here is a blogpost on patience

Deliberate practice and patience

Trend following and surfing

Unlike surfing, we don’t get the luxury of knowing which direction the WAVE we are on is headed, but trust me, it is going somewhere and is not going to sit around in any one place for very long. This is the one and only guarantee in stock markets 😀

We may spend days watching for a sequence of events, enter a trade and get stopped out in minutes. But if we are a trend follower, we have to just get back up and start watching again. That is tough to swallow for traders who enjoy the adrenaline of a fast-paced trading environment

Trading and action

If a trader cannot wait and always in need of action, trend following will never work for him. For that matter, any kind of trading would be difficult.

Many traders love the frequent adrenaline rushes that come with trading. And, the more frequently they trade, the more they feel that they are hitting the fast forward button on their way to riches.

By the way, most successful traders and investors are systematic. Systematic sounds technical or quantitative but that’s far from the truth. All it means is that there is a process to guide proper decision making. When A happens they do Y, when B happens they do Z. Warren Buffett and Benjamin Graham has a very systematic process in searching for their stocks. Ray Dalio from Bridgewaters Associates has a very systematic fundamental approach to capital markets.

Trading and drudgery

Many a times, people ask this question to me. It always pops up in different ways –

Should i pursue the dream of becoming a successful/consistently profitable trader in spite of all these drudgery?

I remember a movie honcho once said that when people asked him if they should continue to pursue their dreams of movie stardom, he would always tell them ‘NO’. His reasoning was simple – no one destined for success would be dissuaded by him anyway, nor for that matter would they even have asked the question in the first place.

It’s that solitary “march to your own drummer” mentality that mark those ordained for success 🙂

Trading and negativity

So, to be effective in trading (and anything in life), kindly distance yourself from negative energy – no matter where it comes from. Let negative thoughts roll over like water. Negative thoughts, emotions, energy is destructive multiplier. It kills creative uni-directional thinking. Detach yourself from things, other people and immerse yourself in the price. Lose sense of time and space.

Think of an activity that you enjoy, we lose sense of time and space when we get involved right? So, let me ask this question then –

Why does trading have to be stressful, painful, edgy all the time?

Get comfortable being wrong and detach from negativity

Happy trading all !!

Your trading is exciting or boring?

Trading is boring

Introduction

Many folks find trading the markets pretty exciting. Why not? Seeing the tickers move wild can give great excitement to anyone and the prospect (not actually making money..just the prospect) of making money can give the best adrenaline rush . A fun-filled activity right? As a matter of fact, they become really sad when the markets are closed as there is no fun in mundane daily activities.

And there are certain set of people who find trading the markets as downright boring. Surprisingly, majority of the consistently profitable traders find this endeavor a really boring one. For them, it is a matter of doing the same thing over and over as long as it keeps on working. Without deviating and without looking for something new. Without getting antsy about “missing out” some great opportunity somewhere else.

Hard work and belief in the process

Let me get this straight – Trading is hard work at the start, but it should be effortless during the trading process. Good or professional traders know this really well. In fact, trading should be boring to some degree when we have our system and methodology down. The reason for this is we know when to pull the trigger and when not to. If market gaps against our position, we know what to do. We know how to react when the time is right. However, it requires hard work to get to this level of professionalism.

Two sides of the same coin

Trading the markets in itself is contrasting in nature. We must be confident, but ego-less. We must be mechanical but analytical, focused but relaxed, and disciplined but willing to learn. Our decisions may appear to be binary, buy or sell but they are markedly more complex.

Acquiring the knowledge of trading mechanics, maneuvers, ideas/strategies, and risk/money management is a relatively easy and determinate process. But, developing the mental skills of focus, discipline, objectivity, and self confidence are much more challenging.

In fact, it’s the one area of trading performance that gives the pleasure of incessant learning experience for the practitioner (trader) , and for some a continuous scuffle (and might feel like never-ending ordeal)

Trading and lack of knowledge

The problems and challenges we face in trading are not due to a lack of knowledge/information, but are due to a lack of patience and self-confidence. Once again, ‘it is never a lack of knowledge’. The sooner we understand it, the faster we can pave the path to recovery.

Enhancement begins with changes in how we choose to think, act and be. Positive changes that will only be realized when we make a decision – a choice to learn to let go off the selfish/self-defeating side of our emotions which blocks our minds and garbles our decisions.

Trading and self-introspection

I will be the first to admit that the journey onto becoming a successful trader is mired with twists and bumps all along, filled with great triumph, and frustrating distress, but everyone has the talent to succeed and the power to create value in their lives.

Now some serious questions to ponder upon —

1. Are you patient enough to wait for the planned trade set up?
2. Are you ready to wait until a valid buy / sell signal is triggered (not jumping the gun)?
3. Can you place and execute the required orders, before the prices move away from the price of entry?
4. Can you focus on your trade without any sort of disturbances, until the trade is completed.
5. Can you patiently follow your exit plan (even if the market moves up and down in-between)?

When we try to introspect by answering these questions, we readily identify that it is not our ‘lack of knowledge’ that is enabling us to lose money in trading but it is the lack of patience(in order to seek excitement).

So, let us focus on acquiring the non-glamorous skills and trading will become more boring than we would have ever imagined !!

Great lesson from Mahabharata – Visualization

Visualization

Most of you already know that am not a religious person but the mythological books can teach us many life lessons. So, my reading habit obviously gravitates even towards mythological stories/ books.

One such lesson can be learned from Mahabharata – it is about visualization.

What is Visualization?

Visualization is simply a mental rehearsal. We create images in our mind of having or doing whatever it is that we want. Visualization techniques have been used by successful people to visualize their desired outcomes for ages. The practice has even given some high achievers what seems like super-powers, helping them create their dream lives by accomplishing one goal or task at a time with hyper focus and complete confidence.

The typical visualization pattern comes from the sports world, where an athlete would imagine themselves winning a championship or standing on the podium receiving a medal.

The key to visualization is to visualize that we already have what we desire. This is simply a mental trick. Rather than hoping we will achieve it, or building confidence that one day it will happen, live and feel it as if it is happening to us right now. On one level, we know this is just a mental trick, but the subconscious mind cannot distinguish between what is real and what is imagined. Our subconscious mind will act upon the images we create within, whether they reflect our current reality or not.

Elite athletes use it. The super rich use it. And peak performers in all fields use it.

Visualization in Mahabharata

After losing in a game of dice, the Pandavas were exiled to the jungles as per the bet waged. So, one of those days, Arjuna – the great archer was eating his dinner in the light of an earthen oil lamp, when a gust of wind
extinguished the flame. Arjuna continued to eat, his hand accurately reaching his mouth every time he ate a morsel of grain in the dark. At this exact moment, a sudden flash of thought embraced his mind.

If it was so easy to accurately place a morsel of food in his mouth, due to force of habit, the food not going into his eyes or nose by mistake, why was it so difficult to aim and shoot down a target in the dark ? This fired him up and the restless soul set about practicing archery in the dark, after staring at the target all day in the sunlight.

The mission was very clear and simple – the mind should be trained to know where to shoot from memory, just as it knew where to guide the hand containing a morsel of food in pitch dark. After months of rigorous practice, twanging his bow all night, for months, Arjuna attained mastery of the dark. The hard work paid off and helped the Pandavas win the battle of Kurukshetra years later. This is sheer Neuro linguistic programming (NLP) in work and ofcourse a lot of visualization before entering the actual arena.

Key take way and usefulness in trading

We all are Arjunas but we just lack something important – a sheer target practice. The mind can and should be trained. Samurais train with their Katanas thousands of times before attaining mastery of the sword. History tells us again and again that it can be done.

In trading terms, Visualization can help us cope with stressful situations (like visualizing to stay calm when we are in a trade) and to reinforce good habits. If one has issue in pulling the trigger/exiting early/jumping the gun, Visualization can be immensely helpful.

Thoughts are things and they create the beginnings of getting any result. The thought process includes not only what we’re telling yourself, but also the pictures that those thoughts summon.

Happy trading all !!

Never start your trading day with an hungry stomach

Brain

Indian stock market starts at 9:15 am. Well past the usual breakfast time for many. Yes – this post is about food 🙂

Behavioral science has been blessed with many stalwarts. Roy Baumeister is one of them. As a behavioral scientist, he wanted to ascertain whether remaining hungry and / or craving for food (though not starving) impacted a human being intellectual performance. As it goes with many researchers, he conducted an experiment.

Details of the Experiment

Two batches of 30 students each, of equal IQ and academic performance were selected. They were locked up in separate rooms for 60 minutes and given an exercise to master in mathematics. In both rooms were ovens, which were halfway into baking cakes and cookies. B

Batch # 1 was instructed to stay away from the oven even after it finished baking and was banned from consuming a single cake/cookie. Batch # 2 was instructed to wait for the oven to cool off before enjoying the confectionery.

Result of the experiment

After the designated 60 min timeframe, Roy Baumeister found batch # 1 floundering in their mathematical questions, whereas batch # 2 breezed through it.

Upon interviewing them, students of batch # 1 admitted that majority of their mental energy was spent in fighting their salivating mouths, the aroma of the cakes & cookies and deep emotional craving for the goodies. This was a great revelation.

But, the experiment did not end there. The roles were reversed and batch # 2 was forbidden from savoring the cakes & cookies and their performance went south as well. This is a very critical piece of information that can be used by traders as it can affect our logical decision making capabilities.

Final thoughts

Next time you decide to skip breakfast because you’re in a rush, please do remember this experiment and how our mothers force-fed us before packing us off to school. One might call that as ‘love and affection’ but indirectly, it served us well.

Moral of the experiment – Never start your trading day with an hungry stomach 😊

Roy Baumeister Profile

https://psy.fsu.edu/faculty/baumeisterr/baumeister.dp.php

Happy trading !!

Social media and its impact on the mindset of a trader

Mentoring

I have been active in Twitter for the past 6 months and this side of world seems to be filled with overly-expressive folks, especially, when it comes to trading. Traders bicker with each other like kids for everything under the roof and keep fighting that their method is the best in the markets. Even a 5-year experienced trader knows that there are many ways to skin a cat and one method is not superior to other.

Open disclaimer first – right off the bat, it may piss some people off but in long run accepting and learning to deal with these basic tenets will definitely help us to move into the small realm of successful traders. Please adopt the supermarket approach. If you don’t like something in this post, please ignore this rambling. This post is not intended to hurt anyone as I do not know 99.99% of the traders in-person. So, not directed to any individual or group. The pointers that are covered below are few of the several reasons that hamper a trader’s progress if he is active in social media during market hours. Whether you are involved in bickering/ego-fighting or just a spectator, the end-result is same, albeit with varied intensity.

1. When one is trading profitably and wishes to teach it to others (the psychological urge behind this teaching could be many but let’s stick to the point), he cannot expect his students to understand it the same way as he has understood. As it is almost impossible to convince a bear to be a bull once he or she has taken a position, it would be even more unfathomable to convince each trader to trade a certain way. I also conduct workshops and I don’t expect my participants to understand the mechanics of my trading style in a day. Once they keep practicing the concept, it might get internalized well in the mind (after dedicated practice) and the idea can open up many possibilities.

While we are at it, would also like to mention that just because we don’t understand a method, does not mean it is not making money for others. ‘Lack of understanding’ cannot be construed as the ‘failure’ of the method discussed. On the flip side, there are 100’s of ways to make money in the markets and it would be childish of us to ridicule other methods. It would be more childlike if we say that my method is superior to others and start chest-thumping – this is so prevalent in facebook/twitter unfortunately. Market returns are cyclical and method A might do better in certain circumstances than Method B – vice versa is equally true. Please understand that everyone has different time frames, methods and objectives. It is also prudent to remind oneself that “every dog has its own day

2. Stop justifying your methodology or trades – who are we are trying to prove here? We don’t need to prove anyone that we are successful in anything. So, why to some strangers? If one is successful in trading, he will exhibit patience as patience is every successful trader’s virtue – without exception. Patience comes with a sense of calmness and confidence. You know you are doing the right thing. Thus, there is no need to justify excessively. On the other hand, stubbornness often comes with anxiety and over-justification. When you find yourself trying too hard to explain what you are doing, you are being stubborn.

Any successful trait needed for trading (like patience, emotional control and discipline) will definitely be reflected in our other aspects of life too. Our family/friends would definitely see the massive difference once we become successful (not only in our finances but also in our behavior) – One of the important perks of being successful in trading.

3. Actually, most of the traders know the reason (or set of reasons) that make them lose money in the markets. But taking corrective action and doing the right set of things to turn profitable is something that individual has to do. Please do keep in mind knowing, and doing are two very different things

4. While people are told they won’t be successful overnight, most new/struggling traders don’t actually believe that. Social media never lets them believe it completely as every other trader is supremely successful in social media 🙂 They have an idea in their head that they’re smarter (Lake Wobegon effect), have it worked out, and will be able to make money quite quickly. So, always in the urge to make money faster and lose it actually.

5. As Master Oogway tells in the movie Kung Fu Panda “One often meets his destiny on the road he takes to avoid it.” (this quote is actually from a french poet Jean de La Fontaine). Most of the traders are determined not to lose money (rather than having a determination to ‘make money’) and in the process, they actually lose more money. Am not saying we are pre-destined to results but this one needs to be taken seriously. Knew many folks who have the aversion for loss and unfortunately, end up in trading (trading needs that loss digesting stomach) and struggle for years.

6. False hope also keeps our enthusiasm going in trading. We can attribute this ‘false hope’ to survivorship bias – We are likely to hear more stories of people making a killing than hearing about people losing everything because the people who lost everything are gone from the public eye and are not talking about it. The few who make money are sure to let everyone know about it (or others talk about them a lot) and thus create a sort of illusion–intentionally or unintentionally– that anyone can do what they did/do.

7. Easy money lure – the lure of making money each day in only a couple hours gets people’s minds spinning with possibilities. They imagine stopping everything and just start trading for a living immediately (For example, lot of chatter happened on Sept 21 2018 EOD about people buying far OTM puts for pennies and selling it for 200s..this kind of chatter happens a lot when mkt moves violently..this also feeds the mindset that money is easy in trading)

As a matter of fact, they would start dreaming about trading in a beach while sipping pina colada. Unfortunately, sand, water, sun glare and laptops don’t mix. You are not gonna get paycheck every month and you must be absolutely at the top of your game without distractions to make money long-run (this is exactly why I keep advocating to get off from social media/forums during market hours). Distraction and ego fights can damage our psychological forte and eventually, we start focusing on things that does not matter.

8. Long story short – stick to a well-defined plan and trade that plan even when it is uncomfortable (and it often will be). The vast majority of the population, and thus the vast majority of traders, buckle under this uncomfortable pressure – the same way we reach for the ice-cream instead of the carrots.

9. On the other side, social media and forums can have a positive/lasting impact on a trader if he can figure out a virtual mentor(mentor does not have to know you but you can follow his principles/thought processes). It can be a great resource of authentic information for new traders as well. But overall, it has never served a trader well if he loiters around in social media during market hours. This is not even debatable any more as the negatives over-weigh positives by a huge margin.

10. So, if you are a losing/struggling trader, try getting off from the forums/social media (for few months) during market hours. See if it has changed your overall mental resilience/trading. I can bet that this will be a great trade to put on as Reward:Risk seems very high. Risk = not being able to participate in conversations/getting updated about latest news, Reward = profitable trading without outside distraction.

Happy trading !!

Price action based trading + System trading Workshop

Introduction

As many of you know, i have been trading just the price (a.k.a naked trading) for the last 13 years and was receiving requests to take classes/workshop on how I do price action trading in a mechanical way(absolutely no discretion involved). Heeding to the popular request, I have decided to share the knowledge to people who are interested to learn. My goal is not only to teach you naked (no indicators) price action based trading for both positional and intraday trading but also about how to consistently make money in the markets – the A to Z of trading

Summary of Workshop details

In the first part of the Workshop, I will talk about the basic concepts in Price action based trading and combine advanced knowledge/experience to make the concept an actionable trading strategy that can be used immediately. Many of the price action based strategies are discretionary in nature but as am a rule based trader, I will be teaching you a simple rule-based concept (for both positional and intra) that can be used as a basic building block to trade any asset class including stocks, options and futures.

In the second part of the workshop, I will round out the course by teaching you how to backtest a strategy effectively (to understand its efficacy in real trading), build a money management plan based on the backtesting parameters (why 2% blanket risk per trade does not suit everyone) and Risk management plan along with trading psychology that is required to make money from the markets consistently. I will also help you learn about building a successful trading plan, whether you are a part-time trader or full-time trader.

On the whole, this one day workshop would be a complete package with a discussion about the price action trading concept i trade and implementing the method in practical real-time trading with heavy focus on psychology and Money management.

Who can attend

1. Anyone who wants to learn rule based (mechanical) price action concept for both positional and intraday trading
2. Traders with little experience but do not make money (Only lose money)
3. Traders who make money but not consistently
4. Traders who make money consistently but cannot scale up in trading size

Who should not attend

1. Individuals that do not have a ‘self starter’ mentality (This workshop is designed to provide you with concept/tools that will help you in becoming a successful trader. Implementing this knowledge will be down to you. There will be no ‘spoon feeding’. This workshop will get you started in the right direction)
2. Individual who think by attending this workshop, they will become rich quickly.
3. Individuals who fear work. Attending the workshop is the EASY part. There is actually lot of work ‘after’ the workshop.

Morning Session Topics – the trading strategy

1. Why price action based trading? – They say ‘Price is the king and it precedes everything’. Is it really true?
2. Market structure – Basics
3. Rallies and declines
4. Details of structural pivot high/lows – how to mark them mechanically (to avoid subjectivity)
5. Trends – what constitutes the trend
6. Analyzing trends based on price action structural pivots
7. Positional price action concept with multiple set of mechanical (rule-based) entry/exit rules. Participants can choose the best set of rules based on their psychological comfort level – some are comfortable with profit booking(targets) and some are comfortable with trailing stoploss.
8. Intraday price action concept with multiple set of mechanical (rule-based) exit/entry rules. Participants can choose the best set of rules based on their psychological comfort level
9. Useful price action tips and tricks to extract more juice from the markets

Afternoon Session Topics – executing the strategy to trade profitably (albeit consistently)

1. What is an ‘edge’ in a system? How to quantify an ‘edge’? Do I really have an edge in my system?
2. How to efficiently backtest a strategy – what to look for and pitfalls?
3. How to evaluate backtesting results to find the optimal risk to be taken per trade?
4. Why taking 2% risk per trade will not work for everyone (like the way it is suggested in popular books)?
4. Money management in trading – how to tailor made money management based on the backtested results?
5. Trading journal and its importance
6. The real holy grail of trading – Execution
7. Part time trading vs Full time trading – Differences and their effect on our P/L

8. Role of psychology in trading – will be covering the below mentioned points in psychology
a) How to create a consistent equity curve so you can get off the roller-coaster ride and sleep at night.
b) How to dramatically ‘level up’ your consistency and escape the ‘Sneaky Mental Trap’ that sabotages your profitability when things get ‘too good’
c) The little-understood way to handle fear that separates successful traders from those who are doomed to fail (Finally, operate at your true potential!)
d) How to become a better trader by becoming a better version of yourself (and why market conditions have very little to do with your results)
e) How to know if your mind is tricking you into taking lame trades with low profit potential and holding you back from the results you truly desire

Capital required (approximate)

1 lac/ lot for Intraday futures trading
2 lacs/lot for Positional futures trading (this can change based on the price of the instrument you are trading)

Fees, timings and location

Fees : Rs. 13000/person (Inclusive of Morning Tea/Snacks, Lunch (Veg & Non- Veg buffet), Evening Tea/Snacks)
Timings : 9 AM – 6 PM

Bangalore date and location:

Date: June 15, 2019 (Saturday)
Location: Citrus Hotel at Cunningham Road, Vasanth Nagar, Bangalore

Chennai date and location:

Date: July 13, 2019 (Saturday)
Location: Quality Inn Airport, Meenambakkam, Chennai

Workshop

Contact details

If you want to be part of the workshop and need further details on payment, please email marketswithmadan@gmail.com or Whatsapp 96770 36689

Participants feedback of Workshops

June 15 2019 Bangalore workshop feedback from the participants

May 11 2019 Mumbai workshop feedback from the participants

Jan 05 2019 Chennai workshop feedback from the participants

October 13 2018 Hyderabad workshop Feedback from the participants

October 6 2018 Pune workshop feedback from the participants

September 29 2018 Mumbai workshop feedback from the participants

August 18 2018 Chennai workshop feedback from the participants

Additional Perks of attending the workshop

1. Telegram support group for the attendees (1 month duration) to clear out workshop related doubts.
2. My favorite e-books on Money Management

Happy trading and looking forward to meeting you in-person !!

Price action trading workshop – Topics

Trading Journal

Received few queries on what would be the topics discussed in the 1-day PAT workshop and here is the probable list –

Morning session topics – the trading strategy

1. Why price action based trading?

2. Market structure – Basics

3. Rallies and declines

4. Details of swing pivot high/lows – how to mark them mechanically (to avoid subjectivity)

5. Trends – what constitutes the trend

6. Analyzing trends based on price action swing pivots

7. Positional mechanical strategy with set of mechanical(rule-based) entry/exit rules

8. Intraday strategy with set of mechanical (rule-based) exit/entry rules

9. Trading results of both positional and intraday strategy – How it has made money consistently in the markets

10. Useful price action tips and tricks to extract more juice from the markets

Afternoon session topics – executing the strategy to trade profitably (albeit consistently)

1. What is an ‘edge’ in a system? How to quantify an ‘edge’? Do I really have an edge in my system?

2. How to efficiently backtest a strategy – what to look for and pitfalls?

3. How to evaluate backtesting results to create a money management plan?

4. Money management in trading – how to tailor made money management based on the backtested results?

5. Trading journal and its importance

6. The real holy grail of trading – Execution

7. Part time trading vs Full time trading – Differences and their effect on our P/L

8. Role of psychology in trading – Everybody talks about discipline/patience but how does that relate to trading success.

Pre-requisites

–*None*–

Who can attend

Anyone who wants to learn price action based trading for both positional and intraday trading

Have more questions?

Please email your questions to marketswithmadan@gmail.com or Whatsapp 96770 36689

Trading workshop

Introduction

B.Krishnakumar and I, are thrilled to announce our collaboration in conducting Trading Workshops across major cities of India. Our goal is not only to teach you some technical indicator/technical analysis but to also to teach you how to consistently make money in the markets – the A to Z of trading. With a combined experience of over 35+ years in stock markets, we are confident that we can make the whole learning process simplified for you.

Trading is one of the most challenging and rewarding careers in the world. But, almost all of us might have heard that close to 95% of traders end up losing money. If you’re trading the markets, the odds are stacked against you. Every day you are up against Dalal Street’s best and brightest, who have unlimited capital and ruthless computer algorithms. That’s hardly a fair fight.

Summary of Workshop details

In the first part of the Workshop, B. Krishnakumar will build upon the basic concepts of Point and figure chart and combine advanced knowledge/experience to make the concept an actionable trading strategy that can be used immediately. Essentially, he will teach you a simple rule-based strategy that can be used as a basic building block to trade any asset class including stock, options and futures.

In the second part of the workshop, I will round out the course by teaching you how to backtest a strategy effectively (to understand its efficacy in real trading), build a money management plan based on the parameters and Risk management plan along with trading psychology that is required to make money from the markets consistently. I will also help you learn about building a successful trading plan, whether you are a part-time trader or full-time trader.

On the whole, this one day workshop will not only teach you a simple (and efficient) strategy but it will also teach how to take your skillset and apply it to trading a strategy professionally – a complete package.

Target audience

1. People with little or no experience in the markets
2. Traders with little experience but do not make money (Only lose money)
3. Traders who make money but not consistently
4. Traders who make money consistently but cannot scale up in trading size

Fees, timings and location

Workshop

Topics details

Session 1 topics – by B.Krishnakumar

1. Basic & how to plot Point & Figure chart
2. What are the benefits of Point & Figure Charts
3. Basic buy / sell signals & Major Point & Figure Chart patterns
4. Fresh signals & Follow Through
5. How to calculate high probability targets
6. Simple Strategy to Trade Nifty Futures Using Point & Figure charts

Session 2 topics – by Madan Kumar

1. How to efficiently backtest a strategy – what to look for and pitfalls?
2. What is an ‘edge’ in a system? How to quantify an ‘edge’? Do I really have an edge in my system?
3. Money management in trading – how to tailor made money management based on the backtested results?
4. Part time trading vs Full time trading – Differences and their effect on our P/L
5. Trading journal and its importance
6. Role of psychology in trading – Everybody talks about discipline/patience but how does that relate to trading success.

Contact details

If you are interested to learn from us, please contact below

Email: pftrader@outlook.com / marketswithmadan@gmail.com

Mobile: +91 – 78240 21649 (B.Krishnakumar) or +91 – 96770 36689 (Madan Kumar)

Trading Q&A – Discipline

Mentoring

Someone asked me a question on ‘how to be disciplined all the time?’ and there was no easy answer. He was disciplined in following his plan most of the times but could not do it 100%. Tried my best to address this typical mindset.

Here is the question (quoting it) and the complete reply-

Question:

“Is/was breaking system/method rules a problem for anyone here? How did you/do you plan to overcome it? It is a problem I struggle with often, I have many days when I dont break rules and suddenly, the gambler in me, the tuktuk in me all get out on a single day and try to destroy my profits. It is not a continuous thing, I do follow rules most days, the gambler and tuktuk guy remain suppressed until one day they rear their ugly heads. Would be great to get some help in overcoming this failure in part, almost feels like a character flaw”

Answer:

We all go through this from time to time. If a trader is disciplined 90 pct of the time and if occasionally there is a lack in trading discipline, the reasons could be multifold —

Probable causes of the problem:

1. Lack of fit between the trader and the trading system

Discipline problems are not due to trading woes. Usually, there is an underlying problem. Just as a problem maintaining the “discipline” of monogamy in a marriage is frequently the result of underlying relationship difficulties, failing to be faithful to one’s trading plans is often a sign of conflict between the trader and those trading plans.

When traders who are normally disciplined find themselves breaking their trading rules, the momentary lack of discipline are a symptom of a lack of fit between who the traders are and what their rules demand. A fine system on paper is unprofitable if it cannot be followed by a trader. A trading method not only needs to be good; it needs to be good for the trader. A trader and a trading system should be like lock and key – it should be a perfect match !!

2. Trader trying to fulfill his short term needs

Sometimes, the lack of discipline involve failing to take trades that are indicated. Other times, the problem is one of overtrading – taking trades that lie outside of one’s rules. If we think of momentary lack of discipline in other areas–cheating on a diet, for example, or procrastinating on work that needs to be completed–we can see that, many times, we act against our longer-term self-interest by becoming caught up in shorter-term needs. If, for example, we cannot tolerate boredom, we might eat to fill the void and break our diet.

Solutions

Problem # 1

Keep a journal and truly investigate each of your small trading discipline slips. Then view those slips as information, not as problems. What do they say about you? Which rules do you find yourself breaking, and what is actually conflicting with those rules?

Now look at your trading successes. What came naturally to you? What rules and plans can be derived from those winning trades? Don’t force yourself into a pre-made set of trading plans (usually derived from somebody else’s plan) but rather, identify what you do when you win and see how you can make *that* into your system. This is one of the primary reasons why ‘copying’ someone’s system never work in the long run.

Problem # 2

When discipline works, it’s often because people have found constructive ways to meet those short-term needs. The smoker who craves a cigarette may chew gum as a substitute oral activity.

The key to sustaining discipline is to identify the specific short-term needs that are occasionally overshadowing trading rules. Once you’ve made that identification, it is easier to then brainstorm constructive ways of addressing those needs. Traders who overtrade, for example, often have problems during quiet market times. Their needs are for stimulation. By creating stimulating activities during the trading day that don’t take them away from their screens, they can avoid using unwanted market activity as their stimulation.

Other times, traders fail to follow their rules because they don’t truly have confidence in their ideas. They front-run their own signals out of anxiety and wait for perfection in setups before they act. Their short-term needs often are for safety and security – they need to believe in what they’re doing. Very often this problem occurs when traders have short-circuited their learning curves. They are putting meaningful capital at risk before they’ve done small real-time trading that is needed to build a successful track record. You believe in your system when you see, in your own experience, that it works over time, across market conditions.

So, keep working on your problems and am sure you will better off gradually!!

Good luck and hope it helps